Softswitch

Block unwanted SIP traffic efficiently

Block unwanted SIP traffic

Blocking SIP traffic manually is a reactive procedure, in the absence of smart tools, being pro-active is nearly impossible, it is common if you’re only reacting to a SIP attack then the damage of different types is already done.

The Challenge of blocking SIP traffic

It is no secret that attackers are pretty smart programmers, commonly attackers use sophisticated tools that scan virtually any network and perform the SIP attacks automatically.

in this context, the same attacker IP address is usually seen by several servers and networks, once these tools identify a vulnerability it’ll start attacking you immediately.

When manually blocking unwanted SIP traffic, our internal data shows that we are more likely to perform SIP blocking after an alert is triggered, for example, alarms start triggering on your resources for Disk space, CPU, Memory utilization while the legit traffic has not increased.

Another operational challenge is when a SIP provider has many nodes that they manually manage, blocking an IP address one node means you have to re-deploy the same rules across the board. Management by hand is a time-consuming process whereas software-defined Automation is fast

Case Study

Recently while working with a vendor and had the sngrep tool open, we noticed many hits coming from unknown IPs, all the attempts were rejected by TCXC‘s `Authentication, Authorizations ` module, however, those attempts still consumed Disk space, CPU, and memory as they kept coming.

We went ahead and blocked the unwanted IP address manually in IP tables and repeated the same across our servers, that’s when we thought it would be a good opportunity to verify and test if this attacker’s IP was already detected by APIBan’s SIP honeypots, an open-source project that we recently heard about at Tadhack 2021.

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Softswitch Less VoIP Explained

How to become Softswitch Less ?

TelecomsXChange introduced The Private Route Exchange tool for all new and existing members, This is not only a feature ! it can act as a full replacement to a softswitch for some providers, saving members with  20-24,000  thousands of dollars a year.

Currently a large number of VoIP (Voice Over IP) service providers use a softswitch to buy and sell a route on the telecom market, in most cases the termination route provider uses a softswitch hosted in the cloud in order to be able to authenticate route buyers and manage routing and billing within the softswitch.

TelecomsXChange current functionality covers most of the technical functionality that any softswitch has to offer, except there was no ability to sell a route a different prices to different buyers based on volume or other factors before, with the Private Route Exchange tool TCXC (TelecomsXChange) member has the power to offer different rates to different buyers all in once place, with this tool being in place everything from route publishing, marketing, rate notification handling and money collection is available within TCXC Platform.

learn more.

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